COVID 19

Council has implemented strict protocols to ensure we comply with directions issued by government in relation to managing the COVID 19 risk. These protocols apply to our staff, our customers and visitors to our premises, and councillors alike. Please be understanding that we will do our best to maintain services and help in what are unique and challenging circumstances.

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Reason for Scars on Trees

Aboriginal people caused scars on trees by removing bark to make canoes, containers and shields and to build temporary shelters. They also cut toe holds in trees to make them easier to climb to use trees as lookouts and hunt for possums or bee hives.

Scar tree at Mount McKenzie. This mountain is a very significant site to the Aboriginal people due to scarred trees, engraved rocks, rock art & other sites situated there.

Above – Scar tree at Mount McKenzie. This mountain is a very significant site to the Aboriginal people due to scarred trees, engraved rocks, rock art & other sites situated there.